Liquid Leaf

This isn’t so much a tutorial as more an answer to a few inquiries I had about the gold elements from the Pink Lemonade Table Decor.  There are a variety of metallic paints, waxes, glazes, leafs, foils, etc. for when you want to add shine to a project.  Each one has a place depending on the project and the look you are going for.  In this case I wanted a poured metallic look to cover the inside of real and scultped seashells and the outside of paperclay sand dollars.

I used Liquid Leaf* to finish these items. The below picture is from Plaid’s website. They have not paid me to say these nice things. In fact I doubt they know this website exists…

Liquid Leaf

You can achieve a leaf-like finish by thickly brushing on a coat and letting it dry.  I use some throw away flux brushes so I don’t have to worry about clean up.

The sugar cube seashell holder and sand dollar were made out of paperclay and covered in liquid leaf. I like the poured look.
The paperclay items did need a wash of thin white acrylic paint so that the leaf wasn’t immediately sucked into the surface. Trust me, I forgot to prime one of them and it used a ton of leaf and left lots of paint strokes.

You can get a metallic accent by brushing a thin coat on as I did with this Goodwill tray.  I did white-wash it with a layer of acrylic paint first and then used the liquid leaf along the bottom edge.

tray accented with liquid leaf

Finally liquid leaf works well on a lot of materials.  I finished the inside of real seashells as well as my faux created ones.

Vignette with various items accented in liquid gold leafTo be honest I initially planned on using rub-n-buff but I couldn’t find the tube in the basement.  However, I like the look of poured and cast metal that the liquid leaf created.  I’ll definitely use it again when I need this particular effect.


Make sure to put a thick coat on if you want a poured look.

DO NOT touch until fully dry.  Just don’t.  Let it dry.

You may need to cover the with a clear acrylic top coat.  Tarnish can occur and heavy use items will rub.

It stinks.  Ventilation is key.  Otherwise it is easy peasy to apply.

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